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My memory sticks wont run at listed frequency

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jfri View Drop Down
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    Posted: April-17-2019 at 4:14pm
I have got two new DDR3 2*8 Gb 2400 MHz memory modules. After installing them I could in BIOS see that they were running at 2133 MHz (like my previous 2*4 Mb modules).
I also see its specifications correctly displayed in BIOS. So when I changed the frequency to 2400 MHz the computer didn't boot but instead I see an error message saying
Overclocking failed
But why is this called overclocking when it is set to the memory native speed ? Is there something more I need to do ? What could the reason for this be ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-18-2019 at 8:36pm
Overclocking Failed - This comes up on any BIOS boot where the BIOS settings will not boot with the hardware.
 
Most likely your motherboard is designed for a certain DDR3 speed and any over that is considered a overclock, ie;   Certified to DDR3 1866,.. O.C. DDR3 2133, 2400, 2800, etc
 
 
If using 2 sticks, make sure these new sticks are in the correct slots for 2 stick operation.
Go into the BIOS
 
Go to the ADVANCED > AI TWEAKER MENU
 
SET TUNER TO: XMP     This loads the correct speed and timing for the installed memory modules.
 
Scroll down and check but most likely DRAM VOLTAGE is not set correctly. Set it to 1.65v, typically this can go to 1.68 if needed.
 
F-10 Save and exit
 
See what happens
 
If it doesn't boot and you get the same message,..  are you overclocking the CPU at this time?
 
If so you may need different/special settings to run DDR3 2400 with your overclocked CPU
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-19-2019 at 12:15pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

 
If using 2 sticks, make sure these new sticks are in the correct slots for 2 stick operation.
Go into the BIOS
 
Go to the ADVANCED > AI TWEAKER MENU
 
SET TUNER TO: XMP     This loads the correct speed and timing for the installed memory modules.
 
Scroll down and check but most likely DRAM VOLTAGE is not set correctly. Set it to 1.65v, typically this can go to 1.68 if needed.
 
F-10 Save and exit
 
See what happens
 
If it doesn't boot and you get the same message,..  are you overclocking the CPU at this time?
 
If so you may need different/special settings to run DDR3 2400 with your overclocked CPU
 


The sticks were in the same slots as my previous modules

Tuner was already set to XMP

DRAM voltage was already 1.65 V and I increased it to 1.68 V

This didn't help

Yes my CPU is overclocked to 4.5 GHz
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-19-2019 at 2:42pm
 
 
 
I don't know what motherboard this is, what BIOS revision is in use or what clock settings are in place. This is where things can get technical for those who don't understand setup and clocking. You may need professional assistance with this but if you read and you have enough basic experience from clocking in the past by using my HASWELL CLOCKING GUIDE,  https://www.simforums.com/forums/haswell-4-8ghz-on-air-building-a-haswell-system_topic46180_post280150.html#280150 
 
 
Haswell and Overclocking 101 -
PREPARE FOR COMBAT
 
 
 and going down from there...   you should be able to do what I outline below but read below FIRST
 
 
  
1. This could be a situation where your current motherboard is not 'designed' to run 2400 memory at all..  go to the website for the board model and verify it is listed in the specs for memory speed. As mentioned it will probably list it as: O.C. <number>  If it is, then....
 
2. Does your motherboard DDR3 32GB? if so does it support @ 2x16GB modules? or 8GB x4?  for 32GB?
 
Go to your motherboard manual.. Find the SYSTEM MEMORY section where is shows WHICH SLOTS to place 1, 2 or 4 sticks and confirm
 
1. Is the memory in the correct slots for 2 stick configuration?
 
2. Scroll down, you will usually find the specifics below that which will say something like:
 
MEMORY CONFIGURATONS:
 
You May install (2GB, 4GB, 8GB, 16GB, 64GB) unbuffered and non-EEC DIMMS into the DIMM sockets.  (usually with a list of stipulations below that statement.)
 
 
IF YOU FIND something wrong with the 2 items above and one of them is you CANT RUN 2x16GB because it is NOT LISTED then your memory purchase was wrong. You need 4x8GB to run 32GB assuming the board will run 32GB based on the Memory section of the motherboard manual.
 
At this point you might as well hang it up until you obtain the right modules. BUT DO NOTE THIS, regardless of them being the SAME DDR3 2133 speed and timing you use now, or, DDR3 2400 (or anything else) you must STILL run through everything I posted below IF you wish to be sure..
 
A. Your new memory is NOT DEFECTIVE or can cause intermittent CORRUPTION while in use.
 
B. Your CPU OVERCLOCK is indeed STABLE for 2/4 stick operation w/32GB installed.
 
Even if you plug it in, set XMP, confirm voltage and IT ALL SEEMS OK, or you can very well end up in Flight Simulator hell because of CHAPTER 2, VERSE 4  of the BIBLE    MEMORY TESTING
 
 
 
 
If everything checks above...  continue below
 
 
 
==========================================================
 
 
 
 
 
The current BIOS of the board may be old and a newer available BIOS in the support section of the manufacture site may have something listed like: "Improved Memory Performance" or "Improved Stability". This MAY or MAY NOT be a factor. Before going that route....
 
 
The 'current' overclock setup for your CPU running DDR3 2100 modules may not be stable with these new memory modules be it because of manufacture of the sticks or other factors (as was listed above), however, it can also be defective or weak/worn electronics in the memory...
You just purchased (or obtained) different memory modules. Does not matter if they are NEW or USED
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Form the BIBLE...
 
CHAPTER 2, VERSE 2
 
- The BIOS has been setup correctly for the memory installed
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Time to test the memory modules. Why? Because these are not confirmed working modules and you must start from BASELINE default to test this correctly.
 
Failure to do this EVEN IF YOU SIMPLY PLUGGED THEM IN, RESET THE BIOS FOR THEM AND EVERYTHING APPEARS TO LOOK FINE, AND SEEMS TO RUN OK..  is a fatal error covered in the next section below this one.
 
In order to do this correctly you will have to begin here..
 
a. Power Down. Reinstall the original memory modules.
 
b. Power up, enter the BIOS, SET XMP and the DDR VOLTAGE.
 
c. Reboot, verify the system boots. Boot into Windows and verify its working again with the original sticks.Verify in CPUz the timing and speed are in fact correct. The frequency is DDR3x2 so for 2133 it will be (approximately) 1066.5 and the timings listed below should be what the sticks you have now are indeed designed to run ie; CL 9   tRCD 11  tRP 1  tRAS 31 going down the list. You have now confirmed a running system.
 
 
d. Reboot into the BIOS. Go to the TOOLS menu. You should see an option to SAVE BIOS OC profiles there. Read your manual and SAVE the current profile to a USB stick so you can restore it later if the new sticks are defective or you wish to return to where you are now. Give it a simple name.
 
 
NOTE BEFORE CONTINUING: ASSUMING the following
 
1. You have come this far and the MB manufacture does list DDR3 2400 2x16GB as a memory option.
 
2. Your new memory passes all the memory tests and sets up correctly in the next section of this outline
 
THEN: Most likely you have a CPU OVERCLOCK that is unstable for running the 2400 memory speed. In this scenario you WILL have to START CLEAN and re-overclock the CPU with the new memory installed running the correct speed/timing all the while TESTING THE OVERCLOCK for stability as you go along. This means using the SAVED OC PROFILE can NOT BE USED and you will have to MANUALLY make all the CPU overclock settings in the BIOS and ALSO reset any custom settings such as GPU, HDD, SSD, BOOT, etc.
 
I would make a suggestion here and it sucks but it also makes sure what you HAVE NOW is recorded MANUALLY so in case anything goes wrong you can return to your current setup that works with DDR3 2133.
 
You can opt for 2 things here...   go through every BIOS screen and write down every current setting (it sucks, but I do it sometimes)  OR  most modern BIOS's allow you to take screenshots and save them. Still a pain because you must scroll down for each screenshot and also enter the SIDE menus to do the same, but it allows a bit faster and less likely to make a mistake. From there you PRINT ALL of the screens in Windows to your printer and there will be a lot of them! 
 
Test print ONE SCREESHOT and see how clear it is and scale. You may find you must print in high quality because the images may be small and hard to see otherwise. But you now have a complete manual record of your entire current BIOS setup before resetting it to DEFAULT and can use it as a BASIS to begin manual input later.
 
To make images.. With a USB stick in a drive and recognized
 
1. Go to the first BIOS menu, usually MAIN
 
2. Hit F-12 and save the image to the USB
 
3. (if you can scroll down) Scroll down that menu to the next section with new settings showing, repeat STEP 2
 
4. IF there are SIDE MENUS on the current menu you are working, you will need to enter each side menu and REPEAT STEP 2 and STEP 3. I suggest following the MENU LIST order to keep the image in the order you would move down the ie; ADVANCED menu and make changes to items such as DRAM TIMING CONTROL or CPU POWER MANAGEMENT.
 
Expect as many as 40-50 images by the time you are finished with all of the menus in the BIOS and do not skip any side menus even if they are all set to DEFAULT because you may need to change one or of those settings and you can then mark your images for the EDIT.
 
 
Choose the method to use to manually restore your BIOS. Write it, or print it and do it first.
 
 
e. Restore your BIOS to complete DEFAULT. This would be RESTORE SETUP DEFAULTS > F10 SAVE AND EXIT. Reboot and confirm you can boot and re-enter the BIOS
 
 
f. If boot is successful, RESTORE SETUP DEFAULTS again, F-10 save and exit but this time SHUT DOWN and power down. Swap your memory sticks
 
 
CAUTION: JUST BECAUSE you are using the same slots the original sticks came out of for the new, doesn't mean they are the correct slots. Someone may have made a mistake along the way and used the wrong slots to begin with and they simply worked. Go to the MOTHERBOARD MANUAL. Look up the memory section that shows the slots and the CHART they show for them.
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------
 
CHAPTER 2, VERSE 4
 
AND AS IT WAS WRITTEN: 
 
HE WHO SKIPS THIS TEST SHALL BE DAMNED TO EVERLASTING SIM TORMENT
 
 
- You have FULLY TESTED each individual module of physical memory installed in the system
 
 This is a major reason for a lot of performance, stability and crash issues related to Flight Sim.
 
Do not skip this step! You may regret it to the hills because after a few reinstall of Windows, reinstalls of Flightsim, addons and then endless searching forums for solutions to crashes and performance problems you find out a memory stick is defective or unstable you will have effectively wasted hours/days/weeks or even months for nothing and a have nicely corrupted Windows and/or sim install.
 
Regardless of if you built your tower or purchased a pre-built unit, failure to verify the memory modules in a system are free of manufacture defect as well as stable after a CPU overclock is one of the primary mistakes users will make.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
SINCE you need to both test memory and then Overclock with the new memory, you are looking for this:
 
NOW it is time to go back to HASWELL OVERCLOCKING 101     Posted: 14-July-2013 at 8:24am:
 
 
 You can skip the BIOS UPDATE and MB DRIVERS part and just get started where it says: BIOS UPDATES - Important     > Item #3    Getting Started
 
 
Go right down the list because it will walk you though everything from preparing to basic BIOS setup, then MEMORY TESTING and from there into the clocking sections which will allow you to make the decision on how high to try and clock, and what settings to START with.
 
Its 1-2-3-4-5, etc
 
 
SKIP the memory clocking section.
 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-19-2019 at 6:25pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

 
 
 
I don't know what motherboard this is, what BIOS revision is in use or what clock settings are in place. This is where things can get technical for those who don't understand setup and clocking. You may need professional assistance with this but if you read and you have enough basic experience from clocking in the past by using my HASWELL CLOCKING GUIDE,  https://www.simforums.com/forums/haswell-4-8ghz-on-air-building-a-haswell-system_topic46180_post280150.html#280150 
 
 
Haswell and Overclocking 101 -
PREPARE FOR COMBAT
 
 
 and going down from there...   you should be able to do what I outline below but read below FIRST
 
 
  
1. This could be a situation where your current motherboard is not 'designed' to run 2400 memory at all..  go to the website for the board model and verify it is listed in the specs for memory speed. As mentioned it will probably list it as: O.C. <number>  If it is, then....
 
2. Does your motherboard DDR3 32GB? if so does it support @ 2x16GB modules? or 8GB x4?  for 32GB?
 
Go to your motherboard manual.. Find the SYSTEM MEMORY section where is shows WHICH SLOTS to place 1, 2 or 4 sticks and confirm
 
1. Is the memory in the correct slots for 2 stick configuration?
 
2. Scroll down, you will usually find the specifics below that which will say something like:
 
MEMORY CONFIGURATONS:
 
You May install (2GB, 4GB, 8GB, 16GB, 64GB) unbuffered and non-EEC DIMMS into the DIMM sockets.  (usually with a list of stipulations below that statement.)
 
 
IF YOU FIND something wrong with the 2 items above and one of them is you CANT RUN 2x16GB because it is NOT LISTED then your memory purchase was wrong. You need 4x8GB to run 32GB assuming the board will run 32GB based on the Memory section of the motherboard manual.
 
At this point you might as well hang it up until you obtain the right modules. BUT DO NOTE THIS, regardless of them being the SAME DDR3 2133 speed and timing you use now, or, DDR3 2400 (or anything else) you must STILL run through everything I posted below IF you wish to be sure..
 
A. Your new memory is NOT DEFECTIVE or can cause intermittent CORRUPTION while in use.
 
B. Your CPU OVERCLOCK is indeed STABLE for 2/4 stick operation w/32GB installed.
 
Even if you plug it in, set XMP, confirm voltage and IT ALL SEEMS OK, or you can very well end up in Flight Simulator hell because of CHAPTER 2, VERSE 4  of the BIBLE    MEMORY TESTING
 
 
 
 
If everything checks above...  continue below
 
 
 
==========================================================
 
 
 
 
 
The current BIOS of the board may be old and a newer available BIOS in the support section of the manufacture site may have something listed like: "Improved Memory Performance" or "Improved Stability". This MAY or MAY NOT be a factor. Before going that route....
 
 
The 'current' overclock setup for your CPU running DDR3 2100 modules may not be stable with these new memory modules be it because of manufacture of the sticks or other factors (as was listed above), however, it can also be defective or weak/worn electronics in the memory...
You just purchased (or obtained) different memory modules. Does not matter if they are NEW or USED
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Form the BIBLE...
 
CHAPTER 2, VERSE 2
 
- The BIOS has been setup correctly for the memory installed
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
Time to test the memory modules. Why? Because these are not confirmed working modules and you must start from BASELINE default to test this correctly.
 
Failure to do this EVEN IF YOU SIMPLY PLUGGED THEM IN, RESET THE BIOS FOR THEM AND EVERYTHING APPEARS TO LOOK FINE, AND SEEMS TO RUN OK..  is a fatal error covered in the next section below this one.
 
In order to do this correctly you will have to begin here..
 
a. Power Down. Reinstall the original memory modules.
 
b. Power up, enter the BIOS, SET XMP and the DDR VOLTAGE.
 
c. Reboot, verify the system boots. Boot into Windows and verify its working again with the original sticks.Verify in CPUz the timing and speed are in fact correct. The frequency is DDR3x2 so for 2133 it will be (approximately) 1066.5 and the timings listed below should be what the sticks you have now are indeed designed to run ie; CL 9   tRCD 11  tRP 1  tRAS 31 going down the list. You have now confirmed a running system.
 
 
d. Reboot into the BIOS. Go to the TOOLS menu. You should see an option to SAVE BIOS OC profiles there. Read your manual and SAVE the current profile to a USB stick so you can restore it later if the new sticks are defective or you wish to return to where you are now. Give it a simple name.
 
 
NOTE BEFORE CONTINUING: ASSUMING the following
 
1. You have come this far and the MB manufacture does list DDR3 2400 2x16GB as a memory option.
 
2. Your new memory passes all the memory tests and sets up correctly in the next section of this outline
 
THEN: Most likely you have a CPU OVERCLOCK that is unstable for running the 2400 memory speed. In this scenario you WILL have to START CLEAN and re-overclock the CPU with the new memory installed running the correct speed/timing all the while TESTING THE OVERCLOCK for stability as you go along. This means using the SAVED OC PROFILE can NOT BE USED and you will have to MANUALLY make all the CPU overclock settings in the BIOS and ALSO reset any custom settings such as GPU, HDD, SSD, BOOT, etc.
 
I would make a suggestion here and it sucks but it also makes sure what you HAVE NOW is recorded MANUALLY so in case anything goes wrong you can return to your current setup that works with DDR3 2133.
 
You can opt for 2 things here...   go through every BIOS screen and write down every current setting (it sucks, but I do it sometimes)  OR  most modern BIOS's allow you to take screenshots and save them. Still a pain because you must scroll down for each screenshot and also enter the SIDE menus to do the same, but it allows a bit faster and less likely to make a mistake. From there you PRINT ALL of the screens in Windows to your printer and there will be a lot of them! 
 
Test print ONE SCREESHOT and see how clear it is and scale. You may find you must print in high quality because the images may be small and hard to see otherwise. But you now have a complete manual record of your entire current BIOS setup before resetting it to DEFAULT and can use it as a BASIS to begin manual input later.
 
To make images.. With a USB stick in a drive and recognized
 
1. Go to the first BIOS menu, usually MAIN
 
2. Hit F-12 and save the image to the USB
 
3. (if you can scroll down) Scroll down that menu to the next section with new settings showing, repeat STEP 2
 
4. IF there are SIDE MENUS on the current menu you are working, you will need to enter each side menu and REPEAT STEP 2 and STEP 3. I suggest following the MENU LIST order to keep the image in the order you would move down the ie; ADVANCED menu and make changes to items such as DRAM TIMING CONTROL or CPU POWER MANAGEMENT.
 
Expect as many as 40-50 images by the time you are finished with all of the menus in the BIOS and do not skip any side menus even if they are all set to DEFAULT because you may need to change one or of those settings and you can then mark your images for the EDIT.
 
 
Choose the method to use to manually restore your BIOS. Write it, or print it and do it first.
 
 
e. Restore your BIOS to complete DEFAULT. This would be RESTORE SETUP DEFAULTS > F10 SAVE AND EXIT. Reboot and confirm you can boot and re-enter the BIOS
 
 
f. If boot is successful, RESTORE SETUP DEFAULTS again, F-10 save and exit but this time SHUT DOWN and power down. Swap your memory sticks
 
 
CAUTION: JUST BECAUSE you are using the same slots the original sticks came out of for the new, doesn't mean they are the correct slots. Someone may have made a mistake along the way and used the wrong slots to begin with and they simply worked. Go to the MOTHERBOARD MANUAL. Look up the memory section that shows the slots and the CHART they show for them.
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------
 
CHAPTER 2, VERSE 4
 
AND AS IT WAS WRITTEN: 
 
HE WHO SKIPS THIS TEST SHALL BE DAMNED TO EVERLASTING SIM TORMENT
 
 
- You have FULLY TESTED each individual module of physical memory installed in the system
 
 This is a major reason for a lot of performance, stability and crash issues related to Flight Sim.
 
Do not skip this step! You may regret it to the hills because after a few reinstall of Windows, reinstalls of Flightsim, addons and then endless searching forums for solutions to crashes and performance problems you find out a memory stick is defective or unstable you will have effectively wasted hours/days/weeks or even months for nothing and a have nicely corrupted Windows and/or sim install.
 
Regardless of if you built your tower or purchased a pre-built unit, failure to verify the memory modules in a system are free of manufacture defect as well as stable after a CPU overclock is one of the primary mistakes users will make.
 
-------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
SINCE you need to both test memory and then Overclock with the new memory, you are looking for this:
 
NOW it is time to go back to HASWELL OVERCLOCKING 101     Posted: 14-July-2013 at 8:24am:
 
 
 You can skip the BIOS UPDATE and MB DRIVERS part and just get started where it says: BIOS UPDATES - Important     > Item #3    Getting Started
 
Go right down the list because it will walk you though everything from preparing to basic BIOS setup, then MEMORY TESTING and from there into the clocking sections which will allow you to make the decision on how high to try and clock, and what settings to START with.
 
Its 1-2-3-4-5, etc
 
 
SKIP the memory clocking section.


First I don't have 32 Gb but 2*8 total 16 Gb and the user guide says 8 Gb modules are supported.
My motherboard is a Z87-PRO and its user guide says Memory 2400 (O.C) among supported speeds
https://www.dustinhome.se/product/5010744957/z87-pro
Bios is version 1205

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-19-2019 at 8:09pm
Ok that's fine!  I may have mixed you up with someone else who was looking for 32GB, none the less, the slots and the board ability is exactly what you needed to confirm first anyway..
 
Sounds to me like its either defective memory product, or, current CPU overclock voltages are too low for 2400 memory, one of the two.
 
Now, since your system will not boot with the sticks then you can't just install them, test them and call it a day with the CPU clock in place. You will have to restore default BIOS and go from there. Just follow the list I posted from where you stopped and keep going down the list and to the link for testing and re-clocking. It should guide you through the entire process and save what you have now so you can easily restore it if you find one or both of the memory sticks are defective and are the issue.
 
If not, it should guide you to installing/verifying/testing and then re-clocking the CPU Thumbs Up
 
You can skip the BIOS UPDATE and MB DRIVERS part and just get started where it says: BIOS UPDATES - Important     > Item #3    Getting Started
 
Beer
 
 
 
EDIT: The latest BIOS for that board is 2103..  Here is something you need to know
 
IF you update the BIOS from your current BIOS you CAN NOT USE a save OC profile to restore it to what you currently have...  So in your case I would probably skip a BIOS update for now and confirm the sticks with MEMTEST and with CPUz in Windows on DEFAULT CPU setup.
 
At that point should you decide to update the BIOS knowing the sticks are good then you will have to re-enter all settings manually anyway,... you can make that choice THEN but you will need to either write your settings down or use the screen-save/print method to save them for manual reentry.
 
 
There is the saying, if it aint broke, don't fix it LOL so keep that in mind. If you are not having any issues then perhaps its best to leave the BIOS @ 1504
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-20-2019 at 7:02pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:


You will have to restore default BIOS and go from there. Just follow the list I posted from where you stopped and keep going down the list and to the link for testing and re-clocking. It should guide you through the entire process and save what you have now so you can easily restore it if you find one or both of the memory sticks are defective and are the issue.
 
If not, it should guide you to installing/verifying/testing and then re-clocking the CPU Thumbs Up
 
You can skip the BIOS UPDATE and MB DRIVERS part and just get started where it says: BIOS UPDATES - Important     > Item #3    Getting Started
 
Beer
 
 
 
EDIT: The latest BIOS for that board is 2103..  Here is something you need to know
 
IF you update the BIOS from your current BIOS you CAN NOT USE a save OC profile to restore it to what you currently have...  So in your case I would probably skip a BIOS update for now and confirm the sticks with MEMTEST and with CPUz in Windows on DEFAULT CPU setup.
 
At that point should you decide to update the BIOS knowing the sticks are good then you will have to re-enter all settings manually anyway,... you can make that choice THEN but you will need to either write your settings down or use the screen-save/print method to save them for manual reentry.
 
 
There is the saying, if it aint broke, don't fix it LOL so keep that in mind. If you are not having any issues then perhaps its best to leave the BIOS @ 1504
 


For now I have reset bios to optimized default. And after that I could set the memory speed to 2400 MHz and the system could boot.
What conclusion can be drawn from that ? Memory is not defective ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-20-2019 at 7:21pm
Nope...  
 
What happen just means the memory 'at least' works for booting and since you got the 2400 with setting it using XMP, and you verified the DRAM VOLTAGE is 1.65,.. it probably means your original CPU overclock was too unstable for 2400 memory.
 
Boot into Windows and check CPUz memory tab to confirm speed and timing..  then you are ready to actually TEST the memory.
 
There is no way around testing memory. Shut down, pull the 2nd stick leaving the first in now and run at least 3 full passes of Memtest (9 tests per pass). Boot the computer with a Memtest CD or a Memtest USB stick, test will start automatically...  Once you hit 3 test runs (it will show results on the bottom of the screen) and NO RED showing you can shut down, swap the sticks and repeat the same test.
 
If you pass both of those THEN you can say the memory is fairly secure for being good.
 
Reinstall the 2nd stick and then proceed to re-clock the system with them in.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-21-2019 at 12:42pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Nope...  
 
What happen just means the memory 'at least' works for booting and since you got the 2400 with setting it using XMP, and you verified the DRAM VOLTAGE is 1.65,.. it probably means your original CPU overclock was too unstable for 2400 memory.
 
Boot into Windows and check CPUz memory tab to confirm speed and timing..  then you are ready to actually TEST the memory.
 
There is no way around testing memory. Shut down, pull the 2nd stick leaving the first in now and run at least 3 full passes of Memtest (9 tests per pass). Boot the computer with a Memtest CD or a Memtest USB stick, test will start automatically...  Once you hit 3 test runs (it will show results on the bottom of the screen) and NO RED showing you can shut down, swap the sticks and repeat the same test.
 
If you pass both of those THEN you can say the memory is fairly secure for being good.
 
Reinstall the 2nd stick and then proceed to re-clock the system with them in.
 


I'm running the memory test now. And after three pass one error has been reported. What should I do then ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-21-2019 at 2:53pm
Ok then either one of three possibilities, you have a defective stick of memory, or, the memory voltage or possibly another voltage needs a bit of a bump, or, the current BIOS may need to be updated for better stability on the 2400.
 
But before you do anything, power down switch the sticks and run the same test.
 
IF you get no errors on the 2nd stick after 3 passes, power down put the original stick back in without changing anything and rerun the test.
 
IF you get the error again on that ONE stick, first mark it so you cant mix them up, next you either have a defective stick that can NOT be voltage trimmed and is simply defective, or, at that point confirm XPM  speed/timing on the one stick and bring DRAM VOLTAGE up to 1.68 F-10 save and exit
 
Rerun the test.
 
From there, there may be one other voltage to try trimming but most likely that stick is in fact defective.
 
 
 
Now, if you get the same single error on BOTH sticks..  it may be possible the BIOS being so old COULD have a defining stability affect on the 2400 memory. At that point updating the BIOS could be an option and then start over with XMP/voltage/confirm in Windows and pull one stick and retest again. You may even want to opt to do that even if only one stick shows errors just to rule out a BIOS issue with a somewhat flakey stick of memory.
 
 
 
Last, this is a huge reason for folks having issues with their sims. They simply have no idea they have been fighting a defective or unstable memory system because the system 'seems' to boot and run just fine, but during high load application use they are getting spanked with either crashes or poor performance issues,.....and can't figure out why.
 
It doesn't matter if a system is custom built/updated by the user, or, comes from a professional system builder..  you don't know if that system builder actually tested the memory they used, correctly.
 
 
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Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Ok then either one of three possibilities, you have a defective stick of memory, or, the memory voltage or possibly another voltage needs a bit of a bump, or, the current BIOS may need to be updated for better stability on the 2400.
 
But before you do anything, power down switch the sticks and run the same test.
 
IF you get no errors on the 2nd stick after 3 passes, power down put the original stick back in without changing anything and rerun the test.
 
IF you get the error again on that ONE stick, first mark it so you cant mix them up, next you either have a defective stick that can NOT be voltage trimmed and is simply defective, or, at that point confirm XPM  speed/timing on the one stick and bring DRAM VOLTAGE up to 1.68 F-10 save and exit
 
Rerun the test.
 
From there, there may be one other voltage to try trimming but most likely that stick is in fact defective.
 
 
 
Now, if you get the same single error on BOTH sticks..  it may be possible the BIOS being so old COULD have a defining stability affect on the 2400 memory. At that point updating the BIOS could be an option and then start over with XMP/voltage/confirm in Windows and pull one stick and retest again. You may even want to opt to do that even if only one stick shows errors just to rule out a BIOS issue with a somewhat flakey stick of memory.
 
 
 
Last, this is a huge reason for folks having issues with their sims. They simply have no idea they have been fighting a defective or unstable memory system because the system 'seems' to boot and run just fine, but during high load application use they are getting spanked with either crashes or poor performance issues,.....and can't figure out why.
 
It doesn't matter if a system is custom built/updated by the user, or, comes from a professional system builder..  you don't know if that system builder actually tested the memory they used, correctly.
 


The second stick made three passes without error. When I repeated the test on the first stick it started to report many errors text scrolling error messages.
I have increased DRAM voltage to 1.68 V and are running the test again.

I have used the memory with games and DCS and didn't notice any problem. If it is defective why could it make two passes.

What option do I have ? Is the memory stick useless ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-21-2019 at 9:52pm
Rerun the test on the stick that showed errors using the 1.68v
 
If it fails again, most likely you just found out why those sticks were dumped by the last owner. The last resort is to update the BIOS on your system, clear the CMOS properly, reset everything back up as you have it now and then retest the sticks again.
 
Could be the last person didn't know there was a bad stick and were plagued with intermittent issues over time while they ran them...  could be they were overclocking the sticks and pushing voltages they should not have been running and know damn well there is a issue.
 
Either way, yes.. 'most likely' that stick is toast because lets face it, if one stick passes the tests in the same slot and under the same conditions and the other doesn't, its not a CPU issue, its not a memory controller voltage issue and I doubt a BIOS update is going to change anything but you could try it.
 
Now, about your inquiry:
 
I have used the memory with games and DCS and didn't notice any problem. If it is defective why could it make two passes.
 
To answer the second part of the question, we DONT accept ONE TEST PASS of any memory test as VALID. Memory fills, dumps, overwrites, updates, is addressed in address by the CPU and changes in real time over and over again. The minimum I would use to call memory stable and not defective is 3 passes...   I personally run 5
 
...and then after I overclock the CPU and the CPU tests pass, I rerun the memory tests again with the overclocked processor.
 
If I fail at that point it is typically a small voltage change on the memory controller of the CPU..  I cover that in the Haswell clocking guide and how to deal with it. I even outline numbers to use as one goes along.
 
If I 100% pass either first time or after a voltage change,... then I can bet the farm I wont have ANY intermittent or mystery crashes, glitches or performance issues that are hardware related. If something does come up I can rule out my hardware stability nearly immediately and look elsewhere. Although after all else and no problem found,.. I would go back to the hardware and check for any components that may have become defective.
 
 
 
 
To answer the first part of the question: I already did answer this. Just because you didn't see any obvious issue playing around in a game, doesn't mean you won't and when you do, what are you going to do then? Because the game ran for so long and all of a sudden it started having intermittent issues now and then skip the fact the memory was never tested, or, if it was with only one or two passes, or, the first 2 are clean and the third shows errors,... there is nothing wrong with the stick(s) that will be bad in Windows? 
 
Then there is the thought that the TEST may be wrong because one just doesn't want to believe they cant use the new hardware they just bought.
 
As I said, this is a huge reason for folks having issues with their sims and it is far more common than most think.
 
Analogy;
 
That's like someone going to a cardiologist for some chest pains every now and then, not bad and very intermittent,... who then ordered in-depth ultrasound, MRI and enzyme blood test (probably far more) on their heart (**3 Test PASSES** I prefer 5) and who advises the person they have a DEFECTIVE (valve, or, right/left side tissue degeneration, or, blocked veins or arteries, or whatever)..  the person thinks its not that bad and goes ahead and does that biking marathon in 2 weeks anyway.
 
Hey, maybe they get through that marathon with no problem, possibly another 2-3 or 4 but notice they may be STUTTERING ALONG at some points and most of the time rock'in, and then a few months later are found face down in a ditch.
 
 
 
Of course you are welcome to skip my advice and just continue with the sticks hoping for the best. Its been my job here, the same as that cardiologist, to provide highly educated and trained technical advice, except I don't get the 10-20+ grand consult fee. Big smile
 
 
So that should answer your questions  LOL
 
I'm sorry about your purchase but the last thing you can try after the DRAM VOLTAGE bump is the BIOS update..  you will find the procedure for that in this post: https://www.simforums.com/forums/haswell-4-8ghz-on-air-building-a-haswell-system_topic46180_post280150.html#280150
 
 
But if you get the same result, the memory stick is definitely toast.
 
Also remember once you flash the BIOS you can not use the OC Profile saved to USB (if you did that) to restore any BIOS settings with the original memory sticks. They must all be restored manually as I outlined.
 
 
 
And one last item...   I would NOT go to P3Dv4.5 yet. There are issues with it that make this statement:  Improved rendering performance    Not so true and currently being reviewed. I would wait for the possibility of a HOTFIX or 4.5+ update is released with some serious performance issues verified as: fixed.
 
 
 
 
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Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Rerun the test on the stick that showed errors using the 1.68v
If it fails again,


Did so and at least this time it didn't fail but made three passes with error count zero

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Either way, yes.. 'most likely' that stick is toast because lets face it, if one stick passes the tests in the same slot and under the same conditions and the other doesn't, its not a CPU issue, its not a memory controller voltage issue and I doubt a BIOS update is going to change anything but you could try it.
 

So trying for example to run the memory at a lower frequency is not an option ? I mean the problem can hardly be like a broken connection but rather a bad one.
Don't know if it's important but when I start to run the memory at 2400 MHz I had to manually set the frequency to that it didn't got there automatic.

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

As I said, this is a huge reason for folks having issues with their sims and it is far more common than most think.


Does it mean that it's common that faulty memory are being sold ? Or do they get faulty after some time ? I think about my older memory they passed the tests some five years ago but I still experienced crashes and some has been about a specific memory address.
 
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Of course you are welcome to skip my advice and just continue with the sticks hoping for the best.


I could use them and if there is a problem put back my old memory.
Sending back the sticks for a refund is not an option.

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

 
And one last item...   I would NOT go to P3Dv4.5 yet. There are issues with it that make this statement:  Improved rendering performance    Not so true and currently being reviewed. I would wait for the possibility of a HOTFIX or 4.5+ update is released with some serious performance issues verified as: fixed.

 
No I think it would make more sense to wait for V5 and see what that will mean. I would expect it later this year.
 
 

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Did so and at least this time it didn't fail but made three passes with error count zero
 
 
Now, that's good news. Doesn't mean its 'awesome' and 'nothing' is wrong though.
 
I would now suspect that single stick is a bit weak and needs a bit higher voltage to run. Doesn't mean it is completely defective but could also mean it may not be as stable as the other stick during CPU overclock without the DRAM bump + some CPU memory controller voltage trimming. The only way to know is to setup a new CPU overclock and once that part is stable/verified, re-run the memory test on the individual sticks.
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 
So trying for example to run the memory at a lower frequency is not an option ? I mean the problem can hardly be like a broken connection but rather a bad one.
Don't know if it's important but when I start to run the memory at 2400 MHz I had to manually set the frequency to that it didn't got there automatic.
 
 
To answer the first part..  Running the memory at lower frequency may be possible. In doing that I would also adjust the timing as well, possibly trying 2133 @ 9-11-11-31 but there is really no way to know what would work or higher reasonable timing values. If it can be done and how successful is time consuming trial and error. You would start out exactly as you are now and try manually change the speed/timing
 
 
 
To answer the 2nd part..  Are you saying when you set XMP (sometimes there can be more than one XPM profile) that you must then manually set the speed / timing / DRAM Voltage (should set 1.65 automatically) of the sticks? Or just the speed? Some memory sticks may not play well with the XMP system on motherboards. That can come down to how much testing the motherboard manufacture has done with memory products at the time.
 
But as long as its just selecting the speed and/or without having to mess with timing, I'm sure its fine. 
 
 
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
Does it mean that it's common that faulty memory are being sold ? Or do they get faulty after some time ? I think about my older memory they passed the tests some five years ago but I still experienced crashes and some has been about a specific memory address.
 
 
You can get a brand new sticks of memory that are defective or just one out of the set. I have had my share of new modules having to be RMA'd after failing initial tests, but, in that there can also be certain memory modules that DONT PLAY WELL with specific motherboards. DDR4 is a prime example of that and today it is far more critical to locate sticks (model numbers of DDR4 memory packages) that are 'certified' by the motherboard manufacture to work with their boards in the Memory QVL list they provide. DDR/2/3 had some issues around that but not like DDR4 has today.
 
 It is not typical for memory that has been properly tested/verified and that is not exposed to dangerous overclocking DRAM voltage to just go bad, and, it doesn't 'wear out' but like anything else electronic a module could bite the dust over time for manufacture or simply defect reasons.
 
If you were getting issues with your original memory, you may have tested the memory starting out, but did you ever test that memory like you have done here (3 full passes) with the CPU overclock in place? Or when the issues started to appear?
 
If not, then you cant point to anything in that area until you do, but sure it is possible you were unstable in a overclock or over time a stick has developed a defect.
 
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
I could use them and if there is a problem put back my old memory.
Sending back the sticks for a refund is not an option.
 
 
By properly testing like you are now, and then retesting after setting up the CPU overclock nets passed tests even if some voltage trims are needed, then you probably wont have memory or stability related issues and any such issues you see are probably going to be application itself / addon issues /video card / driver related
 
 
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
No I think it would make more sense to wait for V5 and see what that will mean. I would expect it later this year.
 
 
I have not heard anything with authority that suggests a v5 is coming or could come end of year at this time. I have heard that there are some very performance degrading issues with the current 4.5 release that are requiring a hard look back to find out what happened and how to correct it with a hotfix or update.. . v4.4 does not show these issues.
 
Even if there is a v5, I wouldn't put any credence into any discussions or rumors of it being some kind of game changer or revolutionary change. People have been saying that since P3D v2 was announced under development and that how many years ago to go from where we were, to where they are now?
 
 
 -----------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 
 
Ok so now that you have run stable initial tests on that stick @ 1.68v, go ahead and proceed to reinstall the 2nd stick re-clock the system and find out where you stand as you progress. Follow my Haswell clocking guide, you will eventually get to the part where I outline specific starting voltages for each speed, test CPU for stability and temps, and what to do if tests pass/fail.
 
 
You could opt to update the BIOS but you know what that means for going back to where you were..   it will have to be done manually but then again what you are about to do must also be done manually too.
 
If you DO update the BIOS, you will need to start over with the memory tests because it is not just the sticks that can present errors/failed tests.. different BIOS's could create a far more stable and better platform, or it could go the other way. You must re-verify after a change like that. and before continuing.
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

 
If you DO update the BIOS, you will need to start over with the memory tests because it is not just the sticks that can present errors/failed tests.. different BIOS's could create a far more stable and better platform, or it could go the other way. You must re-verify after a change like that. and before continuing.


I have updated the BIOS and it solved a little annoying problem with the clock. The RTC didn't run but stood still in BIOS and the time was wrong after windows has started.

Should both sticks be tested again ?

For now I'm running the test with the XMP settings. So the DRAM voltage is 1.65 V. Should I instead set it to 1.68 V ?

May mention that I tried to rerun the memory test before the bios update and then again I got errors reported.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-22-2019 at 9:20pm
 
 
May mention that I tried to rerun the memory test before the bios update and then again I got errors reported.
 
 
The same stick that failed originally but running 1.68v failed another test run? If so, that's not good.
 
 
 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
I have updated the BIOS and it solved a little annoying problem with the clock. The RTC didn't run but stood still in BIOS and the time was wrong after windows has started.
 
Should both sticks be tested again ?

 
Absolutely. I already said that above. The BIOS is the machine code for the motherboard circuits. When you change the BIOS you could be changing a lot of different things including the code that runs the memory hardware.
 
 
 
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
 
 
 
For now I'm running the test with the XMP settings. So the DRAM voltage is 1.65 V. Should I instead set it to 1.68 V ?

 
Only if you find you must raise it in order to stabilize one or more memory sticks so they pass the memory tests.
 
 
 
If you saw the same stick fail in the old BIOS @ 1.68v then I would definitely consider running that test more than once in the new one if the stick now passes just to be sure. You simply power down, then power up and rerun the tests.
 
 
 
 If the same stick fails in the new BIOS and the other doesn't then you definitely have a flakey stick on your hands. The only other thing I can think of is to possibly add some CPU memory controller voltage which you would do in a clock setup anyway.. If you continue to get fails I would not trust that stick of memory.
 
 
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I never got my 2400 sticks running with 2400MHz back on my 3770K build (on a Z77 mainboard) and the "reason" was simply my CPU overclocking. As hardware amateur, I was told that this could be due to the fact that the memory controller is integrated into the CPU and that I have to play around with CPU BIOS settings (as Nick mentioned: memory controller voltage etc.) to make 2400MHz possible. It was true, as soon as I removed the OC of the 3770K, the XPM profile for 2400MHz instantly worked. However, I did not invest that much time into this balancing CPU vs. RAM and went with 2133MHz for the RAM and 4.5GHz for the CPU.
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Originally posted by AnkH AnkH wrote:

I never got my 2400 sticks running with 2400MHz back on my 3770K build (on a Z77 mainboard) and the "reason" was simply my CPU overclocking. As hardware amateur, I was told that this could be due to the fact that the memory controller is integrated into the CPU and that I have to play around with CPU BIOS settings (as Nick mentioned: memory controller voltage etc.) to make 2400MHz possible. It was true, as soon as I removed the OC of the 3770K, the XPM profile for 2400MHz instantly worked. However, I did not invest that much time into this balancing CPU vs. RAM and went with 2133MHz for the RAM and 4.5GHz for the CPU.


When I first plugged in my memory their speed was set to 2133 MHz
So I have tried the memtest at this speed and so far five passes and no errors at all.
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Originally posted by AnkH AnkH wrote:

I never got my 2400 sticks running with 2400MHz back on my 3770K build (on a Z77 mainboard) and the "reason" was simply my CPU overclocking.  
 
 
Most likely not the full reason...   such boards before 4770K Haswell were flakey trying to run 2400 regardless of the advertising. It wasn't until 4770K that 2400 became a stable option period. 37x CPUs and motherboard were not being designed to run 2400+ unless you were willing to pay for the 400+ motherboard and even then it could be problematical although far easier or obtain. 2400 didn't become mainstream stable till Haswell 47x
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When I first plugged in my memory their speed was set to 2133 MHz
So I have tried the memtest at this speed and so far five passes and no errors at all.

 

 

Are you posting to me? Because you answered another member here... So are you saying now that the BIOS is updated you run 2133 with the 2400 sticks individually, NOT together..  i7 CPU's ERROR CORRECT with more than one stick which is why we only run ONE at a time to be sure if there is a defect we see it,.. and you get no Memtest errors?
 
Check CPUz in Windows... What is the timing running the 2400 sticks @ DDR3 2133? If shows it is F = 1066.5(x2) and timing is C9-11-11-31 I can see you leaving it there and running decent performance 9-10-11-31 would be better.
 
What happened after updating the BIOS and running the test @ 2400 on XMP?
 
Both passed?
 
Same stick failed? Did you try a 1.68v DRAM Voltage run with that stick in the new BIOS?
 
 
 
 

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Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:


When I first plugged in my memory their speed was set to 2133 MHz
So I have tried the memtest at this speed and so far five passes and no errors at all.

Are you posting to me? Because you answered another member here... So are you saying now that the BIOS is updated you run 2133 with the 2400 sticks individually, NOT together..  i7 CPU's ERROR CORRECT with more than one stick which is why we only run ONE at a time to be sure if there is a defect we see it,.. and you get no Memtest errors?
 
Check CPUz in Windows... What is the timing running the 2400 sticks @ DDR3 2133? If shows it is F = 1066.5(x2) and timing is C9-11-11-31 I can see you leaving it there and running decent performance 9-10-11-31 would be better.
 
What happened after updating the BIOS and running the test @ 2400 on XMP?
 
Both passed?
 
Same stick failed? Did you try a 1.68v DRAM Voltage run with that stick in the new BIOS?


Yes it was the previous failing stick that made five passed without errors after setting the frequency to 2133 MHz manually in BIOS. I didn't change timings
The stick that didn't fail has just passed three times again without errors and this was with XMP settings (2400 MHz)
All above happened after BIOS update
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Ok, so what happens in the new BIOS with the stick that failed in the old BIOS?
 
Does it fail the same @ 1.65?  What happens with 1.68v?
 
 
Unless I missed something I didn't read anything about the new BIOS and the questionable stick @ voltage.
 
Do you get the same fail as the old BIOS under either condition?
 
 
 
Running 2133 may be fine as long as the timing isn't leaving you worse off than the original 2133 sticks. The timing I posted which is better than your original sticks, may not run on the 2400's but if you can match your original timing and it does and continues to pass, then you have succeeded in increasing the memory amount but will run the same speed as the original sticks.
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Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Ok, so what happens in the new BIOS with the stick that failed in the old BIOS?
Does it fail the same @ 1.65?  What happens with 1.68v?
 
Unless I missed something I didn't read anything about the new BIOS and the questionable stick @ voltage.
 
Do you get the same fail as the old BIOS under either condition?
 

It fails both at 1.65 V and 1.68 V when at 2400 MHz (XMP) just like it did in the old BIOS.
But it didn't fail at 2133 MHz and I'm not sure what the voltage was during this test
 
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Running 2133 may be fine as long as the timing isn't leaving you worse off than the original 2133 sticks. The timing I posted which is better than your original sticks, may not run on the 2400's but if you can match your original timing and it does and continues to pass, then you have succeeded in increasing the memory amount but will run the same speed as the original sticks.


The timings during the test was 11 13 13 31
After trying to set 10 11 11 31 the computer refuses to start. Power on then off then power on and so it goes
EDIT got the computer on again setting 9 11 11 31 did work so now I'm running the mentest with that and at 1.65 V
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Give it a shot!
 
 
Sometimes its not the settings but the setting CHANGE. Always try more than one REBOOT on a setting change because the first boot after can be a code or BIOS glitch.
 
The 10-11-11 was slower and less stress so if it booted at 9-11-11 and not the other it may have simply been a BIOS reboot issue
 
 
Remember the voltage, you can still use 1.68v if that stabilizes the stick.
 
If it passes awesome... then try 9-10-10-31  <--- if you are stable here, I would lock it there but remember after the CPU overclock it may need to go back to 9-10-11 or back to 9-11-11 and in all cases 1.68v may ring it all in on a clock too. You will be increasing memory controller voltage during the clock if you follow my Haswell guide for the CPU speed you are looking for.
 
lower is faster, first number has most influence but the other two lower is great too.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-23-2019 at 6:13pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Give it a shot!
 
 
Sometimes its not the settings but the setting CHANGE. Always try more than one REBOOT on a setting change because the first boot after can be a code or BIOS glitch.
 
The 10-11-11 was slower and less stress so if it booted at 9-11-11 and not the other it may have simply been a BIOS reboot issue
 
 
Remember the voltage, you can still use 1.68v if that stabilizes the stick.
 
If it passes awesome... then try 9-10-10-31  <--- if you are stable here, I would lock it there but remember after the CPU overclock it may need to go back to 9-10-11 or back to 9-11-11 and in all cases 1.68v may ring it all in on a clock too. You will be increasing memory controller voltage during the clock if you follow my Haswell guide for the CPU speed you are looking for.
 
lower is faster, first number has most influence but the other two lower is great too.


It didn't pass. So I restarted the test with 1.68 V. If it fails again I suppose I have no choice but to accept the lower memory speed
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-24-2019 at 12:51am
As suspected from the onset, you simply have a bum/defective stick of memory that will not run its rated speed/timing. The other stick runs and tests fine on the old and new BIOS and at the default speed and voltage of 1.65v.
 
Your only option to use that stick (and even with that DO keep in mind it is defective) is to lower the speed to 2133 and then find the timing that passes the tests. 1.68v wont hurt anything so if you can get 5 passes of Memtest on DDR3 2133 9-11-11-31 or a bit lower (9-10-11-31, 9-11-10-31, 9-10-10-31) .. you can try 32 instead of 31 as well,...  then run with that but do check the 2nd stick at the new speed/timing.
 
Once that is settled, then move on to re-clocking the system and then do verification tests with Memtest after that is settled.
 
 
Sorry you had to go through all this..   typically it would take me about a day to make the call to RMA or not use a memory product. If I buy 2400 memory, I wont down-clock it and from now on when you buy something online (any computer component), never accept a sale that is FINAL and make sure returns are offered.  Also make sure they wont nail you for shipping costs to send it back either.
 
 
I hope through all this you retain the technical knowledge for future reference. Its the first step to assure confidence in system stability.
 
 
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Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

As suspected from the onset, you simply have a bum/defective stick of memory that will not run its rated speed/timing. The other stick runs and tests fine on the old and new BIOS and at the default speed and voltage of 1.65v.
 
Your only option to use that stick (and even with that DO keep in mind it is defective) is to lower the speed to 2133 and then find the timing that passes the tests. 1.68v wont hurt anything so if you can get 5 passes of Memtest on DDR3 2133 9-11-11-31 or a bit lower (9-10-11-31, 9-11-10-31, 9-10-10-31) .. you can try 32 instead of 31 as well,...  then run with that but do check the 2nd stick at the new speed/timing.


None of those timings worked without errors. I have ended up with 10 12 13 31 which so far has not resulted in errors. I have also experienced that the memtest program itself seems to have crashed. Could not press esc to exit or found out that the computer had rebooted into Windows
 
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Sorry you had to go through all this..   typically it would take me about a day to make the call to RMA or not use a memory product. If I buy 2400 memory, I wont down-clock it and from now on when you buy something online (any computer component), never accept a sale that is FINAL and make sure returns are offered.  Also make sure they wont nail you for shipping costs to send it back either.


So you wont recommend take a chance on this
http://www.tradera.com/item/302621/348110536/1-ramsticka-8gb-corsair-vengeance-pro-red-2400mhz-cmy16gx3m2a2400c11r-se-bild
I was aware that there was some risk involved. The sticks costed me about half of what another couple of 2*4 Gb would have costed. And who knows what problem I might have got there ?

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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-24-2019 at 2:06pm
I have also experienced that the memtest program itself seems to have crashed. Could not press esc to exit or found out that the computer had rebooted into Windows
 
I am glad you told me this. Although it may mean nothing it could point to something too.
 
I had you use a older version of Memtest that was certified to work on the 6 year old DDR3 system. I use it here too. I have never seen the application simply crash for no defective hardware or BIOS code clash reason. When you run Memtest and if it crashes where it locks or the system reboots, it is something that would most likely be associated with a defective motherboard/CPU or memory stick that is very unstable.
 
It is possible a newer BIOS may not play well with the older version of Memtest. Since the BIOS is the machine code for the electronics on the motherboard, if a newer BIOS is installed there could be a issue with an older version of the application. There is a solution for that
 
Lets do a little diagnostic on that.. answer the following questions in the diagnostic flow below. ONLY READ AND FOLLOW the items that relate directly to your answer for the question.
 
This may look like a lot to read but it really isn't..  all you are doing is answering questions and following the instructions for each specific answer. At the end of this, which could end with the FIRST ANSWER, you should have a technically logical diagnosis of the Memtest crash.
 
 
This is how we figure out nit-pic technical issues:
 
 
 
 
Question: Did this Memtest crash/lock/reboot happen ONLY with the now known bad memory stick, or with the good one as well?    Bad Stick Only/Both Sticks (see a/b below)
 
 
a. Bad Stick Only - Most likely this crash was due to the stick itself. We know it is defective and it could very well cause the program to crash/lock/reboot. STOP HERE, do not read further with this diagnostic and proceed to the next blue subject section below. Let me know you stopped on A
  
 
b. Both Sticks - Did this Memtest crash/lock/reboot only happen in the OLD BIOS, NEW BIOS or BOTH BIOS's?     Old BIOS Only/New BIOS Only/Both BIOS's  (see b1/b2/b3 below)
 
------------------
 
b1. Old BIOS Only - This would be a strange situation however if Memtest only crashed/locked/rebooted running in the old BIOS only, then there is a possibility some code in that old BIOS was not playing well with Memtest. Since this was experienced with both sticks in the old BIOS but not seen in the new, we can reasonably assume that is the case.  STOP HERE, do not read further with this diagnostic and proceed to the next blue subject section below.  Let me know you stopped on B1
 
 
 
b2. New BIOS Only - In this scenario there is a possibility a newer BIOS is not playing well with a older version of Memtest. The solution for this would be to obtain a newer version. That version would come from here: https://www.memtest86.com/download.htm
 
Click the GREEN BUTTON on that webpage for the FREE edition. It will download a USB stick creation tool with the newer Memtest version. Review the simple README text files and follow the directions to boot the system with the USB stick and rerun the individual stick tests on the memory modules @ XMP 2400 1.65v in the new BIOS. You can opt to run 1.68v with both sticks in the re-test too if you wish.
 
This will eliminate ANY QUESTION the older application was having issues with the newer BIOS and most likely will show the same modules failing/passing running 5 passes on each.
 
Once the tests are complete:
 
IF the result is different than the known bad stick FAILED and the known good stick PASSED let me know and we will go from there. Let me know you stopped on B2-DIFFERENT RESULT
 
If the result is the same with both sticks @ 2400 XMP (bad stick still bad, good stick still tests good): STOP HERE, do not read further with this diagnostic and proceed to the next blue subject section below. Let me know you stopped on B2-SAME RESULT
 
NOTE THE FOLLOWING:
 
The USB stick will be completely erased so if there is anything on it you need, retain that data on a local drive in Windows first to be restored to the stick later.
 
IF your system is not currently set up to look for and BOOT to the a USB stick, plug the stick into the system, simply enter the BIOS > BOOT MENU> scroll down to BOOT OVERRIDE..  you should see a list of drives in the system to boot from. Simply select the USB stick and the system should immediately boot to the stick and start the Memtest runs.
 
IF the USB stick is not listed you may need to enable it in the ADVANCED USB SETTINGS first, OR, the USB port you are plugged into may not be bootable and requires another port. Refer to the motherboard manual about booting to USB.
 
 
 
 
b3. Both BIOS's - This would definitely be a very strange situation however in a case like this I would begin to suspect there could be a hardware issue or a BIOS code issue in BOTH BIOS's on top of a bad memory stick involved. To establish or eliminate that, scroll back up and FOLLOW THE OUTLINE FOR B2 ABOVE to obtain the newer version of Memtest and retest the individual sticks in the new BIOS, THEN skip the RESULT section in B2 and instead answer the questions below:
 
Did the new version of Memtest crash in the newer BIOS?  Yes/No   (see c1/c2 below)
 
c1. Yes, it crashed: Did it crash on the originally diagnosed BAD stick or Both Sticks?  (see d1/d2 below)
 
 
c2. No, it did not crash: Were the 2400 XMP test results the same (as in the same module failed and the other passed)?    Yes, Same Result/No, Different Result:  (see e1/e2 below)
 
-------------
 
 
d1. Bad Stick Only: Most likely this crash was due to the stick itself. We know it is defective and it could very well cause the program to crash/lock/reboot. STOP HERE, do not read further with this diagnostic and proceed to the next blue subject section below. Let me know you stopped on D1
 
 
d2. Both Sticks: This is where I would begin to question that there may be another issue involved with the system. If you get to this point, Let me know you stopped on D2
 
 
-------------
 
 
e1. Yes, Same Result: You have most likely eliminated the issue with the newer version of Memtest. STOP HERE, do not read further with this diagnostic and proceed to the next blue subject section below. Let me know you stopped on E1
 
 
e2. No, Different Result: You will need to let me know the changes in the result from the original tests. If you get to this point, Let me know you stopped on E2
 
 
 
Follow the diagnostic flow chart and let me know where you stopped with any pertinent information.
 
Next Section:
 
============================================================
 
If that is 17 USD  as compared to Swedish Krona and the shipping isn't expensive then yes, I would probably take a shot at that single stick. 
Typically memory modules are purchased as 'matched sets' meaning the manufacture packages them based on being run off and tested 'as a set' regardless of the number of sticks.
 
It appears to be the same model of the memory product,..which is good. The price is low enough whereby its worth the chance simply because you need a replacement for the bum stick you have in order to run 2400.
 
 
Before you do that, lets just recap to make sure we are both on the same page. If so I would go ahead and obtain that stick of memory..
 
Synopsis:
You have 1 stick (that you have properly marked so it can not be mixed up) that FAILS the 2400 test in the slot the motherboard manual outlines to be used with a single DDR3 memory module, and, the other stick always passes in the same slot in both the old BIOS and the new,..  correct?
 
Y/N
 
Yes - Order the single stick you lined and test it. At this point and assuming you went through the diagnostic I posted above,... I see no reason to retest the known good stick. Just mark it as good and test the new one when it arrives.
 
 
No - If what I posted is not correct or only partially correct, what is different or what did I miss?
 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-24-2019 at 3:26pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Question: Did this Memtest crash/lock/reboot happen ONLY with the now known bad memory stick, or with the good one as well?    Bad Stick Only/Both Sticks (see a/b below)

b. Both Sticks - Did this Memtest crash/lock/reboot only happen in the OLD BIOS, NEW BIOS or BOTH BIOS's?     Old BIOS Only/New BIOS Only/Both BIOS's  (see b1/b2/b3 below)

b2. New BIOS Only - In this scenario there is a possibility a newer BIOS is not playing well with a older version of Memtest. The solution for this would be to obtain a newer version. That version would come from here: https://www.memtest86.com/download.htm


Both sticks just confirmed since it just hanged up during test of the non faulty stick.
I'm not sure if it was the old bios during the first hangup. But after reading my previous posting were I mentioned a test just before BIOS upgrade I have a weak memory of that being a hangup. So probably both BIOS.



Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Synopsis:
You have 1 stick (that you have properly marked so it can not be mixed up) that FAILS the 2400 test in the slot the motherboard manual outlines to be used with a single DDR3 memory module, and, the other stick always passes in the same slot in both the old BIOS and the new,..  correct?


I just discovered that the motherboard guide recommends slot A2 for single module and I have used the one at the right edge B2.
And yes the other stick has never failed unless the just recent hangup of memtest counts as a fail.

EDIT I just grabbed that memory stick for 215+63 kr
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-24-2019 at 6:23pm
#1  I just discovered that the motherboard guide recommends slot A2 for single module and I have used the one at the right edge B2.
 
#2  And yes the other stick has never failed unless the just recent hangup of memtest counts as a fail.
 
#1      Ok Whoa!!
 
That's why I had you look at the motherboard manual first before any of this started to confirm the slots and their limits.
 
If you are testing in the wrong slot for single stick use that COULD have a influence. Now, given how many times that stick failed and the other did not I would assume (I hate that word LOL) it will fail in the correct slot however, with that information and the information in #2 above, I would do the following...
 
Put the single sticks into the CORRECT slot and test BOTH sticks AGAIN (5 passes) with the original Memtest...   Reason:
 
A. With the sticks NOT being in the correct single slot that could have been the source of the Memtest lockup.
 
B. There is a very OUTSIDE possibility something about that flakey stick and the wrong single slot is causing it to FAIL.  This is a outside possibility
 
So redo the Memtest passes on each stick in the correct slot
 
IF you get the same STICK results but no Memtest lockup..  call it TESTED and wait for the replacement stick.
 
IF you get the same STICK results but Memtest LOCKS UP...   then FOLLOW the procedure I listed for:  b3. Both BIOS's - above by obtaining the latest Memtest and retry..   follow the answer guide I posted under b3. and let me know
 
 
IF you are now seeing BOTH STICKS PASS Memtest (5 passes)...   reconfirm with the original BAD stick..  If it passes, then that may have been the issue all along. IF it fails again call it TESTED and wait for the replacement stick.
 
That will bring you all the way up to getting the replacement stick. You know what to do when it arrives.
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-24-2019 at 6:36pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Put the single sticks into the CORRECT slot and test BOTH sticks AGAIN (5 passes) with the original Memtest...  


Do you mean the test should be made by the old memtest program and not the new one you previously gave me a link to Memtest86 V8.1 Free ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-24-2019 at 10:06pm
Originally posted by jfri jfri wrote:

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Put the single sticks into the CORRECT slot and test BOTH sticks AGAIN (5 passes) with the original Memtest...  


Do you mean the test should be made by the old memtest program and not the new one you previously gave me a link to Memtest86 V8.1 Free ?
 
I outlined that above....  if you find Memtest locks up, follow B3 above which includes using the newer Memtest
 
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

So redo the Memtest passes on each stick in the correct slot
 
IF you get the same STICK results but no Memtest lockup..  call it TESTED and wait for the replacement stick.
 
IF you get the same STICK results but Memtest LOCKS UP...   then FOLLOW the procedure I listed for:  b3. Both BIOS's - above by obtaining the latest Memtest and retry..   follow the answer guide I posted under b3. and let me know
 
 
IF you are now seeing BOTH STICKS PASS Memtest (5 passes)...   reconfirm with the original BAD stick..  If it passes, then that may have been the issue all along. IF it fails again call it TESTED and wait for the replacement stick.
 
That will bring you all the way up to getting the replacement stick. You know what to do when it arrives.
 
 
 
If you want to go ahead and try both the old and the new Memtest, have at it.
 
At this point you are waiting for the other stick anyway so the time in going back getting the single sticks in the correct slot and rechecking with the old Memtest (and new if you wish) to observe the result(s) is not going to hinder your system time. You can still use the system with the single good 2400 stick temporarily, unless you have already reset your new BIOS to use the original sticks and original clock setup.
 
Either way, at this point you are in a holding pattern so I say make good use of it.
 
The reason I outlined the diagnostic routine was not so much about trying to fix a problem but more to help you learn how to properly deal with new memory and verify systems as you go along.
 
So from now on even with a new system in the future,..do remember what slot(s) the memory should be in when testing/using. That is important. If it wasn't the motherboard manufacture would not specify such things.
 
 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-27-2019 at 6:35am
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

At this point you are waiting for the other stick anyway so the time in going back getting the


That other stick arrived yesterday and have tested it using the new memtest program. That program makes a test and reports test ready press any button.
I have performed five such complete tests without any memory errors reported with the XMP setting.
During the last test after returning to the UI the program hanged up when selecting one menu item. This was also the case when testing the non faulty previous stick with the new memtest. It was not during the memory test but after returning to the UI. The faulty stich has crashed the memtest during the memory test.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-27-2019 at 1:17pm
Ok that is a very strange lockup but I see no reason to associate it with the memory sticks themselves.
 
GREAT NEWS on the new stick! Now that you have 2 confirmed Memtest 5 pass modules and you have confirmed in Windows with CPUz the speed and timing is correct, you are now ready to re-clock the system.
 
Did the new stick pass @ 1.65v like the original good stick did? If so, even better.
 
So now you can go back the Haswell clocking thread in this section
 
 
Haswell and Overclocking 101 -
      PREPARE FOR COMBAT
 
Skip down in that part of the post to:
 
GETTING STARTED:
 
And go down the thread from there. You can skip the memory test since it is now successfully established and make the initial pre-clock BIOS setting changes. From there you can skip the 'AUTOMATIC OVERCLOCKING' section and go strait to the 'MANUAL OVERCLOCKING' section.
 
My outline will set you up for pre-clock BIOS settings, the settings to start with for each speed you wish to accomplish and the test process for each as well as what to change when tests fail.
 
Be aware of the tools I outline for testing and how to use them (all included in the outline)
 
 
If you have questions during the process I will try and help.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-27-2019 at 2:38pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

 
 
Haswell and Overclocking 101 -
      PREPARE FOR COMBAT
 
Skip down in that part of the post to:
 
GETTING STARTED:
 
And go down the thread from there. You can skip the memory test since it is now successfully established and make the initial pre-clock BIOS setting changes. From there you can skip the 'AUTOMATIC OVERCLOCKING' section and go strait to the 'MANUAL OVERCLOCKING' section.
 
My outline will set you up for pre-clock BIOS settings, the settings to start with for each speed you wish to accomplish and the test process for each as well as what to change when tests fail.
 
Be aware of the tools I outline for testing and how to use them (all included in the outline)
 
 
If you have questions during the process I will try and help.


Can or should I have both memory sticks installed during the OC process ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: April-28-2019 at 1:22am
Always both sticks and always at their XMP rated speed/timing and voltage
 
It wouldn't make any sense to clock a system without the total intended amount of memory installed running at the correct specs.
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May-01-2019 at 3:51pm
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Always both sticks and always at their XMP rated speed/timing and voltage
It wouldn't make any sense to clock a system without the total intended amount of memory installed running at the correct specs.
 


I have come to the point where I test with OCCT CPU:LINPACK. I'm at and started with 4.3 GHz. This test fails (temperatures and volts in allowed range) and according to instructions I have raised CPU CORE VOLTAGE OVERRIDE in 0.01 V steps. Now I have reached 1.26 Volt and it failed again. Before my memory upgrade I had 4.5 GHz OC and this
CPU CORE VOLTAGE OVERRIDE was set to 1.26 Volt. The max core temperature was 86 C which I think (but not certain) was higher the my first setup five years ago. This I find a little odd. What could be going on here and what should I do ?
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote NickN Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May-03-2019 at 1:09am

Sorry about the late response..  real world responsibilities.

 
The max core temperature was 86 C which I think (but not certain) was higher the my first setup five years ago. This I find a little odd.
 
 
I would then ask..  Are you sure you ran the AVX load tests five years ago as outlined?  Y/N/Not sure
 
a. Yes - Thet may not be odd. First of all it was 5 years ago, the thermal compound applied to the CPU was fresh, the heat sink plate to the CPU was new, all fans were new, and last you were running 2133 memory, not 2400.
 
So over time the CPU thermal compound could have become less effective and may need to be redone. The heatsink plate sitting on the CPU may have over the years become lightly distorted from heat, and when I say 'lightly' it doesn't take much, something your eyes would never see, and of course if they are completely clean, including the heatsink if this is a air cooled system, the fans may not be spinning with the same RPM or the same torque which can change the CFM (cubic feet per minute) of airflow.
 
If this is a liquid system, everything above sill applies, however, your pump and possibly the radiator as well as the ports on the CPU head are partially blocked from years of use, need to be power flushed cleaned and the liquid replaced. You need to make SURE the liquid connections are restored correctly and there are NO leaks. If the pump has become less efficient over years then it needs to be replaced.. or replace the entire liquid system with a modern version.
 
And last..  when you increase the speed of the memory, you increase the load on the CPU memory controller and therefore the CPU will run hotter.
 
 
b. No - Then you have no way to base compare what happened 5 years ago to what you are doing today and it is very possible if you had run the AVX load tests back then you would have seen the same results.
 
 
c. Not Sure -  I would take that as a  partial 'NO' answer, however, "a" above then becomes a possibility  too.
 
 
 
...and a special...  
 
D: Was hyperthread DISABLED in the past and you forgot to DISABLED it with the last BIOS change? If so then disable it and try again.
 
 
 
 
What could be going on here and what should I do ?
 
 
I outlined the first part of that inquiry above.
 
As for the second part... Verify everything is clean of dust and debris, Check and verify fan speeds and airflow, remove the CPU heatsink, clean both surfaces and perhaps do a little flat wet sanding (that means NOT with your fingers but on a flat plate of glass or tile) on the base of the heatsink with 800-600 grit wet sandpaper and clean it with 90% alcohol to finish.
 
Same with a liquid system except I would remove the liquid tubes from the CPU base plate and make sure there is no partial blockage and at the same time flush out and replace the CPU cooler liquid...  as for the pump and checking, that is more difficult without the ability to change the flow rate.
 
After both are done (air heatsink or liquid system correctly reapply thermal compound and reattach) and then repeat the tests. If you get the same result then you are simply dealing with the increased load on the memory controller caused by the 2400 memory and will need to make adjustments for that as well because of no longer being able to run 4.5GHz stable with 2400Ghz memory unless you replace the current cooling system with a far efficient solution that will handle the uptick in temperature.
 
 
 
Now I will say this and I said in the Haswell clocking write-up.. AVX load test will apply loads to your CPU that unless you are using engineering or other software that use the Intel AVX instruction system (Flightsim never will) you will never see temps that high even under 100% CPU load.
 
The reason I outlined the AVX load test is because it is THE REAL TRUE load test for MAXIMUM heat. If I didn't outline that test to be used and some dope comes along, reads what I said whereby I DIDN'T include that test, and then they fired up a Audio/Video editing program that uses AVX instruction.. they would then either burn up their CPU, or of they are lucky, the CPU would shut down just before it burned up..
 
THAT is why I outline the AVX test. It 100% shows you where your cooling solution is with your overclock if you EVER run an application that uses AVX code instructions.
 
 
If you are 100% sure you will NEVER run any application that hits the CPU with load AVX instruction code, THEN you can SKIP testing with AVX loads in both AIDA and uncheck AVX in OCCT Memory test.
 
But be warned.. you saw what your temps are with AVX enabled in the load tests..  You will hit well over 100c if you set your system up without testing AVX load and going by no AVX load test result.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May-03-2019 at 8:44am
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

I would then ask..  Are you sure you ran the AVX load tests five years ago as outlined?  Y/N/Not sure


Yes I am quite sure even If I don't have any exact memory. The instructions were clear and I don't see why I should miss that.

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:


If this is a liquid system, everything above sill applies, however, your pump and possibly

Yes this is a liquid system a H110
http://www.dustinhome.se/product/5010667185/hydro-series-h110-extreme-performance-liquid-cpu-cooler

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

D: Was hyperthread DISABLED in the past and you forgot to DISABLED it with the last BIOS change? If so then disable it and try again.


Yes it was disabled

Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:

Now I will say this and I said in the Haswell clocking write-up.. AVX load test will apply loads to your CPU that unless you are using engineering or other software that use the Intel AVX instruction system (Flightsim never will) you will never see temps that high even under 100% CPU load.

Apart from flightsims I also use other games and also have a astrnomy program Starry Night Pro plus and a game called Universe Sandbox that simulates astrophysical concepts.
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote jfri Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: May-03-2019 at 9:21am
Originally posted by NickN NickN wrote:


What could be going on here and what should I do ?
 
As for the second part... Verify everything is clean of dust and debris, Check and verify fan speeds and airflow, remove the CPU heatsink, clean both surfaces and perhaps do a little flat wet sanding (that means NOT with your fingers but on a flat plate of glass or tile) on the base of the heatsink with 800-600 grit wet sandpaper and clean it with 90% alcohol to finish.
 
Same with a liquid system except I would remove the liquid tubes from the CPU base plate and make sure there is no partial blockage and at the same time flush out and replace the CPU cooler liquid...  as for the pump and checking, that is more difficult without the ability to change the flow rate.
 
After both are done (air heatsink or liquid system correctly reapply thermal compound and reattach) and then repeat the tests. If you get the same result then you are simply dealing with the increased load on the memory controller caused by the 2400 memory and will need to make adjustments for that as well because of no longer being able to run 4.5GHz stable with 2400Ghz memory unless you replace the current cooling system with a far efficient solution that will handle the uptick in temperature.


I must admit that I feel uncomfortable about this except for the dust cleaning. Feels risky and difficult particular the part about open up the liquid cooling system.
I might also tell what I did since this post. I backed back to the lower 4.0-4.1 GHz and now I'm at the point of fine trimming CPU cache and agent voltages.
I have passed the test at 4.1 GHz and
CPU CACHE VOLTAGE OVERRIDE: 1.26 Volt

CPU SYSTEM AGENT VOLTAGE OFFSET: 0.23 Volt
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